Courses

We are involved in a range of courses in the Bachelor and Master programmes from Climate Sciences, Physics as well as Human Medicine. Most courses and seminars are held in English.
Please note that some courses are not held each semester and may be taken in several programs of study. For details on eligibility in different programs please consult the KSL website.

All courses will be announced via KSL - Central Teaching System, (www.ksl.unibe.ch). The latest data is always published in KSL!

Spring semester

This topic of this lecture is the general atmospheric circulation and modes of variability. The basis to understand the atmospheric circulation is fluid dynamics applied to the atmosphere. Thus, the course will first introduce the dynamical and thermodynamical equations necessary to understand the atmospheric dynamics. Then these equations are simplified to gain understanding in midlatitude dynamics. There, the quasi-geostrophic equations deliver a first understanding how waves develop and grow. The budget of angular momentum and energy will give insight why we observe meridional overturning cells in the atmosphere and why mid latitude waves are so important in transporting energy from the equator to the poles. Finally, the statistical description of introduces a different view point on the atmospheric circulation. In this respect modes of variability such as El Nino Southern Oscillation or the North Atlantic Oscillation will be presented.

See Introduction to Atmospheric Circulation and Modes of Variability in KSL

See Introduction to Atmospheric Circulation and Modes of Variability in ILIAS

Exam Info

Date:Thursday, 8. July 2021
Time:08:00 - 18:00
Location:TBD
  
Info:Depending on the number of students the final exam is planned to be oral. Each student will be questioned 30 min.

Lecture overview:

DateTopicInstructor
25.02.21 Introduction to the Course, Overview of achievements in atmospheric dynamics and the basic driver via zoom link (to be announced) Raible
04.03.21 Introduction of the exact dynamical equations Raible
11.03.21 Scale analysis and simplification of the dynamical equations Raible
25.03.21 The quasi-geostrophic approximation Raible
01.04.21 Atmospheric waves Raible
08.04.21 Holiday for good Friday: no lecture
15.04.21 Baroclinic instability and the two-layer model Raible
22.04.21 The general circulation, part I: Observations and momentum budget Raible
29.04.21 The general circulation, part II: Energy budget Raible
06.05.21 North Atlantic Oscillation Raible/Buzan
13.05.21 Ascension Day: no lecture
20.05.21 El Niño Southern Oscillation Raible
27.05.21 El Niño Southern Oscillation Raible
08.07.21 Final exam Raible/Gonzalez/Buzan/Messmer

Problem class overview:

DateTopicInstructor
11.03.21 Problems of section 2 Tips Gonzalez/Buzan/Messmer
18.03.21 Discussion of Problems of section 2 Gonzalez/Buzan/Messmer
25.03.21 Discussion of Problems of section 3 Gonzalez/Buzan/Messmer
01.04.21 Discussion of Problems of section 4 Gonzalez/Buzan/Messmer
08.04.21 Holiday for good Friday: no lecture
15.04.21 Discussion of Problems of section 5 Gonzalez/Buzan/Messmer
22.04.21 Discussion of Problems of section 6 Gonzalez/Buzan/Messmer
29.04.21 Discussion of Problems of section 7 Gonzalez/Buzan/Messmer
06.05.21 Discussion of Problems of section 8 Gonzalez/Buzan/Messmer
13.05.21 Holiday for good Friday: no lecture
20.05.21 Discussion of Problems of section 9 Gonzalez/Buzan/Messmer
27.05.21 Questions to all Problems All

The lecture represents an introduction to various aspects of fundamental and applied glaciology. It covers the description and basic role of the cryosphere in the climate system with special focus on alpine glaciers and ice sheets including the role of glaciers as climate archives using ice core drilling. First hand glaciological experience may be collected during a 1-day excursion. The main topics covered are:

  • Ice in the climate system
  • Mass balance and glacier morphology
  • Firnification
  • Deformation and flow of ice (continuum mechanics)
  • Temperature distribution in ice
  • Ice core research (isotopes, aerosol, gases)

See Glaciology and Ice Cores in KSL

See Glaciology and Ice Cores in ILIAS

Fall semester

Carbon emissions from fossil fuel burning and land use change perturb the Earth System in a fundamental and non-sustainable manner. In this lecture we will discuss the anthropogenic perturbation of the carbon cycle and the role of natural carbon cycle variations for atmospheric CO2 and climate. The lecture provides a natural science background to better understand the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and the Paris Agreement.

See Carbon Cycle in KSL

See Carbon Cycle in ILIAS

Anthropogenic climate change is one of the greatest challenges faced by human societies. The reduction of human caused greenhouse gas emission to meet the climate targets of the legally-binding Paris Agreement is key to reach the UN sustainability goals. This lecture will discuss the fundamentals of the climate system including the atmospheric radiation balance, carbon and other biogeochemical cycles, ocean and atmospheric circulation, multiple climate equilibria, climate variations of the last million years and applications of stable isotopes and radionuclides to trace environmental processes.

This course can also be attended by master and PhD students of the Graduate School of Climate Sciences.

See Introduction to Climate and Environmental Physics in KSL

See Introduction to Climate and Environmental Physics in ILIAS

This topic of this lecture is the general atmospheric circulation and modes of variability. The basis to understand the atmospheric circulation is fluid dynamics applied to the atmosphere. Thus, the course will first introduce the dynamical and thermodynamical equations necessary to understand the atmospheric dynamics. Then these equations are simplified to gain understanding in midlatitude dynamics. There, the quasi-geostrophic equations deliver a first understanding how waves develop and grow. The budget of angular momentum and energy will give insight why we observe meridional overturning cells in the atmosphere and why mid latitude waves are so important in transporting energy from the equator to the poles. Finally, the statistical description of introduces a different view point on the atmospheric circulation. In this respect modes of variability such as El Nino Southern Oscillation or the North Atlantic Oscillation will be presented.

See Introduction to Climate Modelling in KSL

See Introduction to Climate Modelling in ILIAS

This course introduce the students to the main elemental cycles on Earth and discusses issues of sustainable development of the Earth System processes.
This course can also be attended by master and PhD students of the Graduate School of Climate Sciences.

See Stable Isotopes in KSL

See Stable Isotopes in ILIAS